1981 TV report about future of online news

This 1981 KRON-TV report about the future of online news has surfaced on social media sites. It’s a must-watch video. The report begins with an anchor saying, “Imagine, if you will, sitting down with your morning coffee, turning on your home computer to read the day’s newspaper.” That probably sounded far-fetched 30 years ago. Who could have predicted the monumental [&hellip

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“Disability” overlooked in diversity discussions

There’s an important part of diversity discussions in newsrooms and classrooms that needs to be addressed: disability. People with disabilities make up an estimated 20% of the population in the United States, and one in five families includes a member with a disability. Despite these statistics, in comparison to other minority groups, people with disabilities are overlooked in news coverage [&hellip

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Verifying social media information

I recently presented “Too Good to Be True?” at the BEA (Broadcast Education Association) Ignite session in Las Vegas. BEA Ignite shares the best enterprise ideas for the classroom. You can view all the Ignite presentations here. This group exercise helps students determine the credibility of social media information. News professionals can also use these tips. We know misinformation can [&hellip

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Quoted in story about Facebook’s promoted posts

An article in Nonprofit Business Advisor explores nonprofits’ use of Facebook in their marketing and public relations efforts. Facebook recently made changes to the algorithm that controls the number of posts people who ‘like’ a page can see.  For example, if you ‘like’ the page of a nonprofit, all of the organizations’ posts may not show up in your news [&hellip

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How do traditional media remain relevant amid all the changes?

Despite the seismic changes fueled by the Internet, and exacerbated by the economic downturn that led to the further erosion of advertisers, mainstream media–management as well as rank and file–have been late to adapt to change. Although journalists typically pride themselves on the ability to adapt to changes throughout a workday, their flexible nature has not been so evident when [&hellip

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Improving your social media brand

There are a number of ways job seekers can improve their social media profiles to ensure they stand out (in a positive way!) to potential employers. I share the following tips with my students before they go on the job market. If you’re recently unemployed, you may also find these recommendations helpful. Social media has changed the job search process–even [&hellip

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MarCom Awards for magazine, new website

The MarCom Awards released its list of 2012 winners. I’m thrilled the judges recognized two projects I’ve spent considerable time getting “off the ground.” The 2012 issue of Snapshots of Impact, the annual magazine of the Burton Blatt Institute  at Syracuse University, received a Platinum Award in the competition. I produce the annual magazine, serving as executive editor and writer, [&hellip

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Reflections from #AEJMC12: Don’t lament the dying of the old way

Conversations about the future of journalism often focus on the demise of the industry. I do not argue with the fact that the industry is undergoing a dramatic transformation, an uncertain future. Digital media has allowed a once passive audience to become active consumers and producers of information. An active audience demands more of journalists, one factor leading to an [&hellip

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Chicago-bound for journalism education conference

I recently learned that my research paper has been accepted for presentation at the Association of Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) annual conference. My research focuses on journalists’ adoption of new media and the resulting impact on their job routines. Indeed, mass communications has always been influenced by technology, and this is an exciting time to teach and study [&hellip

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New parents’ Facebook use not surprising

A study published in the July 2012 issue of the journal Family Relations is the first to investigate new parents’ use of Facebook. The results are not all that surprising. If you spend even a small amount of time on Facebook, you are bound to see parents boasting about their bundles of joy. The photos shortly after birth or even [&hellip

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