How do traditional media remain relevant amid all the changes?

Despite the seismic changes fueled by the Internet, and exacerbated by the economic downturn that led to the further erosion of advertisers, mainstream media–management as well as rank and file–have been late to adapt to change. Although journalists typically pride themselves on the ability to adapt to changes throughout a workday, their flexible nature has not been so evident when [&hellip

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Reflections from #AEJMC12: Don’t lament the dying of the old way

Conversations about the future of journalism often focus on the demise of the industry. I do not argue with the fact that the industry is undergoing a dramatic transformation, an uncertain future. Digital media has allowed a once passive audience to become active consumers and producers of information. An active audience demands more of journalists, one factor leading to an [&hellip

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Chicago-bound for journalism education conference

I recently learned that my research paper has been accepted for presentation at the Association of Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) annual conference. My research focuses on journalists’ adoption of new media and the resulting impact on their job routines. Indeed, mass communications has always been influenced by technology, and this is an exciting time to teach and study [&hellip

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Students and ‘aha’ moments

As the quieter summer months take hold, with another academic year behind us, this is the perfect time for reflection. Looking back at what was accomplished always seems to put the daily grind into perspective. One of the great joys of this past semester was teaching budding journalists at Syracuse University’s Newhouse School and Utica College. The semester, for the [&hellip

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Bloggers are journalists — in some cases

Thanks to the recent case involving a blogger who was ordered to pay $2.5 million to an investment firm she wrote about, the evolving debate about bloggers as journalists rages on. The judge in the case ruled Crystal Cox is not entitled to protections afforded to journalists. Courts have not been definitive in their determination of whether bloggers should be [&hellip

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New Media — Don’t Lament the Dying of the ‘Old Way’

The State of the News Media report drives home what we in the communications industry, whether we like it or not, already know: new media provides countless channels for people — who traditionally turned to newspapers, television, and radio for news — to consume information. The resulting impact on the industry has been seismic. But, all should not appear so [&hellip

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Uncharted Territory on the Information Superhighway – and in the Courtroom

Blogs raise many challenging legal issues, including those involving defamation, privacy, and the legal definition of a blogger. From a legal perspective, emerging new media, which includes blogs, is rapidly evolving. The law has yet to catch up with the pace of new media and the issues they present. Courts handling new media cases have attempted to apply preexisting laws, [&hellip

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Tenant’s tweet leads to lawsuit

Who knew that a 140 character tweet could lead to a $50,000 defamation lawsuit for a Chicago woman? Amanda Bonnen wrote the tweet in reference to a battle with her landlord over alleged mold in her apartment. (I’ve learned you can never use alleged enough.) Horizon Group Management filed a lawsuit against her, claiming that her statement damaged the company’s [&hellip

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Is Jon Stewart the most trusted anchor?

Now that Walter Cronkite is gone, is there another news anchor who might be worthy of the being called “The Most Trusted Man in America.” Brian Williams? Matt Lauer? Charles Gibson? Nope! Think Jon Stewart. Stewart’s show that mocks traditional newscasts and how stories are reported has attracted a huge following since its debut nine years ago. Now, The Daily [&hellip

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My predictions about the Web were all wrong

In the late ’90s when I was studying abroad in Europe, one of my communications professors assigned a term paper that was to focus on our predictions of the Internet’s future. Until a recent spring-cleaning — a purging of sorts — at my parent’s house, I had all but forgotten about my eight-page attempt to make sense of the emerging [&hellip

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