Uncharted Territory on the Information Superhighway – and in the Courtroom

Blogs raise many challenging legal issues, including those involving defamation, privacy, and the legal definition of a blogger. From a legal perspective, emerging new media, which includes blogs, is rapidly evolving. The law has yet to catch up with the pace of new media and the issues they present. Courts handling new media cases have attempted to apply preexisting laws, [&hellip

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Tenant’s tweet leads to lawsuit

Who knew that a 140 character tweet could lead to a $50,000 defamation lawsuit for a Chicago woman? Amanda Bonnen wrote the tweet in reference to a battle with her landlord over alleged mold in her apartment. (I’ve learned you can never use alleged enough.) Horizon Group Management filed a lawsuit against her, claiming that her statement damaged the company’s [&hellip

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Is Jon Stewart the most trusted anchor?

Now that Walter Cronkite is gone, is there another news anchor who might be worthy of the being called “The Most Trusted Man in America.” Brian Williams? Matt Lauer? Charles Gibson? Nope! Think Jon Stewart. Stewart’s show that mocks traditional newscasts and how stories are reported has attracted a huge following since its debut nine years ago. Now, The Daily [&hellip

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My predictions about the Web were all wrong

In the late ’90s when I was studying abroad in Europe, one of my communications professors assigned a term paper that was to focus on our predictions of the Internet’s future. Until a recent spring-cleaning — a purging of sorts — at my parent’s house, I had all but forgotten about my eight-page attempt to make sense of the emerging [&hellip

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Learning from Cronkite

It’s not just journalists who should take pause to reflect on the contributions of Walter Cronkite. All communications professionals can learn a valuable lesson from Cronkite’s matter-a-fact style, a signature of a truly credible man. A 1973 U.S. poll named him “The Most Trusted Man in America.” So, how do you get people to trust you and your message? A [&hellip

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The passing of journalism’s rock

Walter Cronkite embodied all that journalism should be: open, honest, credible, and truthful. I fear the passing of Cronkite signals the end to an era when journalism stayed true to the fundamentals it was built upon. Cronkite’s passing comes at an interesting time – when journalism is being transformed by new media. The longtime CBS News anchor’s dedication to informing [&hellip

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Theory behind jumping on the new media “bandwagon”

2009 So have you jumped on the Twitter or blogging bandwagon yet? Are you an early adopter of new technology or “a laggard?” A slacker as I like to call them. There’s a theory that helps to explain how new innovations are adopted. I know, you’re probably thinking: “Theory? Boring!” But, hear me out on this. Diffusion of innovations, established [&hellip

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Looking to the past to explain the future

2009 Yes, I know, you’ve heard plenty about how we’re in the midst of a dramatic communications revolution, thanks to the birth of the Internet and new media. Journalists, advertisers, and public relations folks are attempting to figure out how to use all the new tools — blogs, Facebook, Twitter, etc. — in order to capture an increasingly fragmented audience [&hellip

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