You Can’t Post That! Social Media Policies in Newsrooms

The use of social media by journalists raises new ethical and professional dilemmas. As a result, news outlets are implementing policies addressing what is and what is not permitted on social media platforms. Suzanne Lysak, associate professor of broadcast and digital journalism at Syracuse University, and I recently published a paper on this topic in the Electronic News journal. Through [&hellip

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Study Reveals Social Media’s Impact on Newsroom Editorial Decisions

Popular, or trending, topics and content on social media play a significant role in local television newsrooms decisions about which stories to cover. That’s the finding from my latest research, Forces at the Gate: Social Media’s Influence on Editorial and Production Decisions in Local Television Newsrooms, published in the Electronic News journal. This nationwide survey of news directors at network affiliate television stations explores [&hellip

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Social Media Policy Study Presented at AEJMC Conference

A Survey of Social Media Policies in U.S. Television Newsrooms, co-authored with Syracuse University journalism professor Suzanne Lysak, focuses on how the use of social media by journalists raises new ethical and professional dilemmas. As a result, news outlets are implementing policies addressing what is and what is not permitted on social media platforms. I presented the paper at the [&hellip

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Social Media’s Impact on Editorial Decisions in TV News

My nationwide survey of news directors at network affiliate television stations explores the impact social media is having on editorial and production decisions related to newscasts. I recently presented the research paper in Montreal at the annual conference of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. Key Findings Popular, or trending, content and topics on social media are [&hellip

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Social media study published in Electronic News journal

My solo-authored research paper, A Digital Juggling Act: New Media’s Impact on the Responsibilities of Local Television Reporters, was published in the Electronic News journal. The Nieman Journalism Lab at Harvard included the research in its monthly round-up of digital and social media research. This study focuses on the concept of “journalism as process” and creates a framework to view [&hellip

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Reflections from #AEJMC12: Don’t lament the dying of the old way

Conversations about the future of journalism often focus on the demise of the industry. I do not argue with the fact that the industry is undergoing a dramatic transformation, an uncertain future. Digital media has allowed a once passive audience to become active consumers and producers of information. An active audience demands more of journalists, one factor leading to an [&hellip

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Chicago-bound for journalism education conference

I recently learned that my research paper has been accepted for presentation at the Association of Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) annual conference. My research focuses on journalists’ adoption of new media and the resulting impact on their job routines. Indeed, mass communications has always been influenced by technology, and this is an exciting time to teach and study [&hellip

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New parents’ Facebook use not surprising

A study published in the July 2012 issue of the journal Family Relations is the first to investigate new parents’ use of Facebook. The results are not all that surprising. If you spend even a small amount of time on Facebook, you are bound to see parents boasting about their bundles of joy. The photos shortly after birth or even [&hellip

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Bloggers are journalists — in some cases

Thanks to the recent case involving a blogger who was ordered to pay $2.5 million to an investment firm she wrote about, the evolving debate about bloggers as journalists rages on. The judge in the case ruled Crystal Cox is not entitled to protections afforded to journalists. Courts have not been definitive in their determination of whether bloggers should be [&hellip

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New Media — Don’t Lament the Dying of the ‘Old Way’

The State of the News Media report drives home what we in the communications industry, whether we like it or not, already know: new media provides countless channels for people — who traditionally turned to newspapers, television, and radio for news — to consume information. The resulting impact on the industry has been seismic. But, all should not appear so [&hellip

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